NextGen Humanities

NextGen Humanities Episode 3 – Miranda Sachs & Childhood, Adulthood and Generations

August 09, 2020 Zachary Mazur Season 1 Episode 3
NextGen Humanities
NextGen Humanities Episode 3 – Miranda Sachs & Childhood, Adulthood and Generations
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NextGen Humanities
NextGen Humanities Episode 3 – Miranda Sachs & Childhood, Adulthood and Generations
Aug 09, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Zachary Mazur

In this episode we sit down with Miranda Sachs who has a PhD in history from Yale University and is currently a Senior Lecturer at Texas State University.
Her academic work has thus far covered the history of childhood in modern France, but as our conversation shows, it has relevance well beyond that context.
We talk about generational perspectives, the shifting definitions of childhood and adulthood over the past century.

You can find her articles online or follow her on Twitter @miranda.sachs
While you're at it, give me a follow too! @nextgenhum

If you're interested, here are her (light) reading suggestions on the history of childhood:

Sarah Walters, “’Child! Now you are’: Identity Registration, Labor, and the Definition of Childhood in Colonial Tanganyika, 1910–1950,” The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth 9, no. 1 (2016): 66-86.

Susan J Pearson, “ ‘Age Ought to Be a Fact’: The Campaign against Child Labor and the Rise of the Birth Certificate,” The Journal of American History 101, no. 4 (2015): 1144-1165.


Thanks to Adam Pisarkiewicz for the music.
 
https://www.zacharymazur.com/

Show Notes

In this episode we sit down with Miranda Sachs who has a PhD in history from Yale University and is currently a Senior Lecturer at Texas State University.
Her academic work has thus far covered the history of childhood in modern France, but as our conversation shows, it has relevance well beyond that context.
We talk about generational perspectives, the shifting definitions of childhood and adulthood over the past century.

You can find her articles online or follow her on Twitter @miranda.sachs
While you're at it, give me a follow too! @nextgenhum

If you're interested, here are her (light) reading suggestions on the history of childhood:

Sarah Walters, “’Child! Now you are’: Identity Registration, Labor, and the Definition of Childhood in Colonial Tanganyika, 1910–1950,” The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth 9, no. 1 (2016): 66-86.

Susan J Pearson, “ ‘Age Ought to Be a Fact’: The Campaign against Child Labor and the Rise of the Birth Certificate,” The Journal of American History 101, no. 4 (2015): 1144-1165.


Thanks to Adam Pisarkiewicz for the music.
 
https://www.zacharymazur.com/